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2.5" SSD

Why is the actual storage capacity of the product slightly less than the volume written on the product specification?


All storage products will display a less memory capacity on a computer than stated. The discrepancy is resulted from the way flash memory and hard drive manufacturers calculate the megabyte of memory.

Based on internal testing; performance may vary depending on drive capacity, host device, OS and application. 1MB=1,000,000 bytes.
1GB = 1,000,000,000 bytes. Actual user storage less.
In addition, addlink will save partial memory capacity for firmware, software applications, data storage and maintenance.




Will the SSD experience a performance decrease? If so, is there a way to reset the drive to a factory default?


Performance decreases have been reported on some SSDNow drives. If you have an older SSD drive that does not have effective Garbage Collection, SSD drive performance will decrease over time. This is due to the way the system overwrites data that has been flagged for deletion.
Try using the Secure Erase tool like HDDErase to wipe the drive and restore it to its original condition.




Can I use two or more SSD drives in a RAID?


Any of our SSDs can be used in RAID. However, due to endurance specifications, only certain part numbers should be used in RAID. For servers, please contact addlink to determine the best addlink SSD to use for your workload.




When I connect my SSD as a secondary drive, it’s seen as new hardware but can’t see it as a usable drive.


Open the Control Panel, open Administrative Tools and then open Computer Management. Click on Disk Management and see if the SSD drive is shown in the right window pane. If it is, right-click on where it is labelled as disk 1, disk 2, etc. and select "Initialize disk" (this may come up automatically when you go into Disk Management). In XP, right click on the area to the right of that and choose "New Partition". Then choose "Primary Partition" in the partition wizard. Continue with the wizard by choosing the size, drive letter and formatting of the partition. In Windows Vista and 7, right click on the area to the right of the disk label and choose "New Simple Volume". Continue with the wizard by choosing the size, drive letter and formatting of the partition. In MacOS, a "disk insertion" window will appear. Click on the "Initialize" button. This will take you to the disk utility. Select the addlink drive from the list of drives on the left side of the window. From the actions available, choose Partition. For the "Volume Scheme", choose "1 partition". For the format, choose MacOS extended for a permanent drive. Choose ExFAT for an external drive (available on MacOS 10.6.6 and above). Click Apply. A warning window will appear stating that you will erase all data from the drive. Click on the partition button at the bottom.




My new SSD is not being seen by the BIOS in my 2008 or older computer. My older SATA drive is seen in the same port. Why?


Our SATA III (6Gbit/s) SSDs are tested to be backwards compatible to SATA II (3Gbit/s). They are not designed or tested to be backwards compatible with SATA I ports (1.5Gbit/s). Most systems made before 2008 used SATA I ports. Our SSDs will likely not work in these systems.




Why do I get a blue screen with an error message, "STOP 0x0000007B INACCESSABLE_BOOT_DEVICE," when installing Windows 7/Vista OS using the SSD?


This issue occurs because the SATA driver is uninstalled or is disabled before the SATA setting is changed from IDE to SATA. Please go to Microsoft support for more information: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976/en-us




Why does my SSD fail to boot into Windows 7/Vista after I change the SATA setting from IDE to AHCI in the BIOS?


This issue occurs because the SATA driver is disabled before the SATA setting is changed from IDE to SATA. Please go to Microsoft support for more information: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976/en-us




How can I make sure that my original operating system and settings can be safely duplicated to my new SSD, and function normally?


To save your time for reinstallation, and to make sure that the comprehensive settings are preserved, we recommend that you duplicate the original system to the new SSD. Transcend advanced SSD Scope includes a System Clone Utility that can duplicate all the contents, including operating system (OS), programs, data, etc., from your current hard drive to your new Transcend SSD in just a few steps.




If my motherboard only supports SATA 1.5Gb/s or 3Gb/s interface, can I use a SATA III 6Gb/s SSD?


You can use a SATA III 6Gb/s SSD on a motherboard supporting SATA 1.5Gb/s or 3Gb/s interface only. However, the transfer speed will not reach the defined level of SATA 6Gb/s.




What is the difference between internal SSDs and normal mechanical hard disks? What are the benefits of SSDs?


The main difference between SSDs and normal mechanical hard disks is the storage medium. SSDs use flash memory whereas mechanical hard disk drives use magnetic plates. Unlike general hard drives, SSDs contain no spinning disks, spindles, springs, gears, bearings or any other fragile components susceptible to mechanical damages. Additionally, SSDs offer faster transfer speeds, lower power consumption, superior durability, and silent operation.




What is the difference between SATA I, SATA II and SATA III?


SATA I (revision 1.x) interface, formally known as SATA 1.5Gb/s, is the first generation SATA interface running at 1.5 Gb/s. The bandwidth throughput, which is supported by the interface, is up to 150MB/s. SATA II (revision 2.x) interface, formally known as SATA 3Gb/s, is a second generation SATA interface running at 3.0 Gb/s. The bandwidth throughput, which is supported by the interface, is up to 300MB/s. SATA III (revision 3.x) interface, formally known as SATA 6Gb/s, is a third generation SATA interface running at 6.0Gb/s. The bandwidth throughput, which is supported by the interface, is up to 600MB/s. This interface is backwards compatible with SATA 3 Gb/s interface. SATA II specifications provide backward compatibility to function on SATA I ports. SATA III specifications provide backward compatibility to function on SATA I and SATA II ports. However, the maximum speed of the drive will be slower due to the lower speed limitations of the port.





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